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Volume 5, Issue 1

Volume 5, Issue 1

Letter from the Associate Editor
Some thoughts from our associate editor, Christina Belcher.

Book Review: Paul D. Spears & Steven R. Loomis. Education for Human Flourishing:  A Christian Perspective.
Reviewed by David Robinson

Bible Theory or Biblical Living: What are Christian schools providing for families with children with special needs?
A.Y. “Fred” Ramirez, Melissa Stymeist
Private Christian elementary and secondary schools, along with Bible training and Bible exercises, have been a part of the United States and international community since the 1800s. This article examines these questions: (1) What Biblically-based principles are in evidence in Christian schools’ treatment of children with special needs; and (2) how do Christian schools work with the parents of these children. Results from the Christian schools that participated in this study indicate although that they were attending to their children with special needs, these schools may actually be missing many more students who are in need of services.
Private Christian elementary and secondary schools, along with Bible training and Bible exercises, have been a part of the United States and international community since the 1800s. This article examines these questions: (1) What Biblically-based principles are in evidence in Christian schools’ treatment of children with special needs; and (2) how do Christian schools work with the parents of these children. Results from the Christian schools that participated in this study indicate although that they were attending to their children with special needs, these schools may actually be missing many more students who are in need of services.

An Examination of Professional Development Activities Available to Teachers in the Mid-America Region of the Association of Christian Schools International
Linda M. Neuzil and Marsha Vaughn

The spotlight in education in recent years has been focused on the areas of professional development activities for teachers and the development of professional learning communities. However, the majority of research has omitted the Christian school community which requires its own body of research examining the unique conditions in which both private school students and educators learn and work. While the need for student achievement remains constant in both public and private schools, the social, philosophical, political, financial, and emotional contexts are quite dissimilar. The purpose of this study is to examine the availability and utilization of professional development activities in select schools in the Mid-America Region of the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) that support the development of professional learning communities (PLC).

Culturally Responsive Teaching: The Bible tells me so
Nyaradzo Mvududu

The US population is becoming more and more diverse. This is the reality. In light of this fact people in all walks of life – e.g. education, healthcare, religion – will inevitably interact in their day to day lives with others who are increasingly different from themselves. It follows that for these interactions to be effective, we need to become more culturally competent. We need to be aware of how culture shapes us and those around us. In order to cross boundaries that can arise from our difference we need to acknowledge and value those differences. For Christians, being culturally competent is not just a good idea, it is a Biblical mandate. This paper describes cultural responsiveness in teaching, discusses diversity in the Christian context and makes a case for cultural responsiveness as a Biblical mandate.


Student / Faculty Collaboration
Agents of Hope
Primary Author: Steve Sider
Student Co-authors: Angie Bonvanie, Amanda Knowles, Annalisa Luimes, Leanne Van Bostelen

This paper considers the Christian teacher’s ”place” in today’s increasingly diverse public school classrooms. Specifically, the paper explores the complexities of working as a Christian within educational systems which promote tolerance of all cultures and religious views.  Is it possible for a Christian teacher to remain committed to The Way while employed in a system which encourages pluralism, equity, and diversity? Using insights and responses of participants in a Christian university education course on teaching in multicultural classrooms, a framework is provided to consider what it means to teach as a Christian in multicultural school settings.


About the Journal
The ICCTE Journal is a scholarly community for Christians in Teacher Education.